Man-made nature at Råbjerg Mile

The great dune of Råbjerg Mile originally formed more than 300 years ago; sand drift may have occurred for several reasons: First, there was a transition to cooler climate (called "the little ice age") and it meant that the sea pulled back, adding more sand beach, and its partly man-made with a more intensive use of livestock and peat cutting. Today the great dune of Råbjerg Mile is left as a monument for future generations to understand the problem of sand dune drift.

One day I was hiking near Råbjerg Stene, on the heath I came along some dead pine trees and I had to stop and photograph the beautiful patterns on the trees. A fire had mutilated the trees many years ago, but now they are a great motif for a photographer like me. The heath needs human care or else it would turn into a wilderness of trees and bushes, sometimes the trees are cut down and burned; its a great way to renew nature!.



The great dune of Råbjerg Mile (B+W)
(Nikon D700, Carl Zeiss ZF.2 100mm 2,0 T* Makro-Planar, iso 200, handheld)

Burned wood with Lichens and Mosses
(Nikon D700, Carl Zeiss ZF.2 50mm 2,0 T* Makro-Planar, iso 200, handheld)

Burned wood pattern
(Nikon D700, Carl Zeiss ZF.2 50mm 2,0 T* Makro-Planar, iso 200, handheld)


The Råbjerg Mile Collection - Great Sand Dunes of the North Sea Coast, Denmark

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